computing

July 16, 2019

At Semicon West 2019, a panel of industry experts kicked off a debate on whether Moore’s Law -- the great prediction given to us by Gordon Moore, which declared that the number of components per integrated circuit would regularly double over a predictable period of time (originally 12 months, later expanded to 24 months) -- was still alive. Over the last decade, discussions of whether Moore’s Law was sustainable in the long term or had already died and been replaced by other methods of scaling have become more common.

July 08, 2019

“Huge amounts of capital and talent are going to be thrown at building self-reliance and establishing a kind of parallel ecosystem here without dependence on U.S. chips, operating systems,” said Ben Harburg, managing partner of MSA Capital, a Beijing-based venture capital firm. “The rationale is that this moment created demand. Previously, it didn’t have demand for those Chinese chips...

June 23, 2019

The US and China have been locked in a race for the world's most powerful supercomputer. China was in the lead with its Sunway TaihuLight, which has a 93 petaflop capacity. But the US surpassed that last year, when it released the Summit, which can run at 200 petaflops -- or 200 quadrillion calculations per second.

April 14, 2019

It’s not clear how many users are still using Windows XP worldwide. Surveys like the Steam Hardware Survey no longer show any results for the venerable OS, while NetMarketShare claims worldwide, 3.72 percent of machines are still running XP. The OS was supported in-market (in one form or another) for 17 years, 7 months, and 16 days -- just shy of being old enough to vote.

April 08, 2019

To understand the scale of the problem, consider this: When it shut down in December 2018, the LHC generated about 300 gigabytes of data every second, adding up to 25 petabytes (PB) annually. For comparison, you’d have to spend 50,000 years listening to music to go through 25 PB of MP3 songs, while the human brain can store memories equivalent to just 2.5 PB of binary data. To make sense of all that information, the LHC data was pumped out to 170 computing centers in 42 countries.

April 03, 2019

The Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) today released a set of government policy recommendations for sustaining and strengthening America's global leadership in semiconductor technology and ensuring the United States wins the race to harness the transformative, semiconductor-enabled technologies of the future, including artificial intelligence (AI), quantum computing, and advanced wireless networks.

March 26, 2019

Intel Corporation and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will deliver the first supercomputer with a performance of one exaFLOP in the United States. The system being developed at DOE’s Argonne National Laboratory* in Chicago, named “Aurora,” will be used to dramatically advance scientific research and discovery. The contract is valued at more than $500 million and will be delivered to Argonne National Laboratory by Intel and sub-contractor Cray Inc.* in 2021.

March 05, 2019

The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy announced Monday that it has officially launched the National Quantum Coordination Office. The new office, a requirement for which was set out in the National Quantum Initiative Act that President Trump signed into law in December, will coordinate quantum efforts between agencies across the government.

February 07, 2019

The White House is expected to take action within the next few weeks aimed at boosting U.S. artificial intelligence and 5G deployment, an administration official confirmed to The Hill. The plan will offer the "first deliverables" of the National Quantum Initiative Act, a law passed by the previous Congress that laid out an initiative to improve U.S. efforts on quantum technology, according to the official.

February 03, 2019

Along America’s west coast, the world’s most valuable companies are racing to make artificial intelligence smarter. Google and Facebook have boasted of experiments using billions of photos and thousands of high-powered processors. But late last year, a project in eastern Tennessee quietly exceeded the scale of any corporate AI lab. It was run by the US government.

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