Women

Powerful #GirlsWithToys Campaign Proves Once And For All That Women Have A Place In STEM

Using the #girlswithtoys hashtag, female scientists and engineers shared pictures of themselves or others with tools and equipment. Some posed next to rovers, while others took selfies with their lab equipment. A few were pictured next to some "toys" that were a little beyond our understanding.

Google, NASA work together on Disney show to inspire girls into sciences

There are certain television tropes about computer scientists that just drive programmers nuts. They include the portrayal of coders as sun-starved and soft-bellied nerds who spend long hours alone in front of their computers. And almost always, those TV characters are male. So when Disney Junior approached Google and NASA last year for a new series about a space adventure-seeking boy, his smart sister who codes and mother who drives the family spaceship, everyone involved in the project was determined to bury those stereotypes.

STEM Gender Stereotypes Common Across the World

It's common for people to associate science fields with men more than women – a problem STEM education advocates in the U.S. are trying to solve. But America isn't the only country struggling with such a stereotype. In fact, a study published Monday by Northwestern University found people in the Netherlands were the most likely to associate science with men more than women.

In open letter, female founders push for positive women-in-tech stories

More than 50 female founders and executives of companies — including TaskRabbit, Gilt, One Kings Lane and Aspect Ventures — co-signed the letter, which was posted Wednesday. The media, they wrote, should spotlight successful women and positive statistics. That would encourage more to strive for the top rungs of Silicon Valley, or simply join the industry in the first place, they said.

How women are breaking the glass ceiling in STEM

Women getting into positions of leadership needs to begin, in part, with women giving each other support and guidance, according to Landon and Hart. Both are involved in that effort, mentoring young women who aspire to go into STEM fields. Landon is involved in several outreach efforts and Hart is involved with shaping the curriculum for University of North Florida's engineering program. Hart, in fact, sees it as a responsibility.

Educators Seek New Ways to Spark Girls' Interest in Science

A recent study done at Indiana University carries frustrating implications for women in STEM-related fields. The research, led by IU social psychologist Kathryn Boucher, found that negative stereotypes about women and their math ability can significantly decrease their performance.

Study Finds 3-1 Shortfall of Women in STEM Careers

However, a report by the Girl Scouts of America, published in 2012, shows hope for seeing a significant increase in women in STEM disciplines in future generations. According to the report, girls are drawn to the STEM disciplines by the creative, hands-on aspects of the fields. Girls are also interested in making a difference in the world and need more exposure to STEM disciplines in order to understand how these fields can achieve their goals.

Ensuring Students have Equal Access to STEM Courses

One priority of this Administration is to make sure we are doing everything we can broaden participation in STEM. That’s why the  Administration’s Race to the Top competition focused not only on encouraging states to develop comprehensive strategies to improve achievement and provide rigorous curricula in STEM subjects, but also to broaden the participation of women and girls.

Los Angeles is Next in Battle Over All-Girls Science, Tech Schools

From Google to Facebook, the nation's biggest tech companies are dealing with work forces that look a lot alike -- white and overwhelmingly male. But the problems for girls start in grade schools, some say, well before future innovators arrive in places like Silicon Valley. One determined band of Los Angeles educators thinks it has an answer: a girls-only public school that focuses on science, technology, engineering and math -- designed to boost girls' flagging performance in those "STEM" subjects compared to their male peers.

Towards More Women in Technology

The dearth of women in technology has long been attributed to the pipeline problem of fewer girls in the STEM area of education. Although at the K12 level, girls are taking high level mathematics and science courses at similar rates as their male classmates, the ratio continues to remain lopsided when it comes to computer science, as shown by a survey of the Advanced Placement Exams - only 19% of girls took the computer science exam in 2011.

How to Get More Girls Involved in STEM

Creating STEM programming that engages girls earlier in their elementary and secondary-school education will help shift the classroom dynamic away from one that is majority boys and thus more welcoming to girls. Supporting interdisciplinary STEM projects—such as using computer programming in a science class to process or visualize a data set—will give students a better understanding of how these subjects are used in real life.

Women In Technology: Why It's Good For Everyone

I’m heading to Ireland soon to take part in the IT@Cork European Technology Summit. The conference is ambitious for certain and will be tackling hot issues from the Cloud, STEM, Digital Media and The Future Of Talent, with top-tier guests from industry leaders, such as VMware, and bright lights in tech education, such as CIT. I’m speaking on a benchmark panel (and a digital marketing one too with a different angle) talking about gender diversity in technology and business.

3 women hope to change the face of Wind Energy Technology

For three women in Wind Energy Technology at Texas State Technical College, the male-dominated wind industry will be the change and challenge they’re all looking forward to taking on soon. All three come from different backgrounds but have found solidarity in each other. Lupita Contreras from San Juan worked as a truck driver in the gas and oil industry hauling crude oil for 12 years before deciding to make a career change.

Girls In STEM: Parent Stereotypes May Discourage Daughters From Science, Technology, Engineering, Math Careers: Study

The world has a problem getting -- and keeping -- girls in science, despite campaigns in various countries to raise awareness in schools and recruit students to tech companies. But recent research suggests children's parents could be the ones primarily perpetuating gender stereotypes in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

Gender bias in US research funding investigated

At the request of three Congresswomen the US Government Accountability Office (GAO) has launched an investigation into whether gender bias is influencing the awarding of research grants, which would be illegal under US law.There is evidence of gender disparity in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (Stem) research at US universities and 4 year colleges – women hold only 35% of all tenured and tenure-track positions and 17% of full professor positions in Stem fields.

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