Women

TV Series Showcases Girls in STEM

With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), Richard Hudson and his team at Twin Cities Public Television are putting middle school girls in front of a national audience on the PBS series "SciGirls." This is the first television science series designed specifically for girls, ages eight to 12, to inspire and empower them to consider careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

Myths about girls' interest in sciences, engineering

Myth: From starting school, girls are less interested than boys in science. Most girls and boys start elementary school with similar positive attitudes about science. The culture around STEM is what turns the girls off as they get older. At our Children's Hospital injury center, we're working to disprove this myth; our large student program recruits the best trainees, and women are well-represented. They have gone on to STEM careers and advanced degrees.

Girlstart is inspiring underprivileged girls into STEM with the help of FlowPlay

From now until Jan. 5, players of FlowPlay’s online social games, Vegas World and OurWorld, can buy in-game items that will directly fund Girlstart, an Austin, Texas-based nonprofit on a mission to empower girls in science, technology, engineering, and math. It’s hoping the extra funding will help more girls see a career in STEM, very much a male-dominated area, as something they can actively pursue.

Help Wanted: Seeking Women Entrepreneurs in STEM

The share of small businesses owned by women is increasing (29 percent), but significant growth opportunities remain for women entrepreneurs in STEM (U.S. Census Bureau, Survey of Business Owners, 2007). Results from the 2010 Survey of Doctorate Recipients underscore the gender gap in STEM entrepreneurship and patenting, with women STEM PhDs engaging in both activities at lower rates (5.4 percent versus 7 percent, and 15 percent versus 28 percent, respectively).

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ASTRA Celebrates Women in STEM at National Women’s History Museum Forum!

ASTRA Celebrated Women in STEM at The National Women’s History Museum’s Breaking In: Women & STEM, Then and Now discussion held at The George Washington University November 20th about the excellence of women in STEM fields and their destiny as integral members of the STEM community. ASTRA, as an advocate for increased innovation and nationwide capacity in STEM, believes our global competiveness is strengthened when its female members are empowered.

ASTRA’s Senior Advisor and Futurist Dr. Ronnie Lowenstein and ASTRA-NetGeneration of Youth Innovation Fellow Anabel Diaz-Guzman met with Eleanor Clift (Moderator; contributing editor for Newsweek and blogger for The Daily Beast), Mimi Lufkin (Panelist; CEO of the National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity, NAPE), and Regina Morantz-Sanchez (Panelist; Professor of Women’s Social Medicine History, University of Michigan) to discuss the history and future of women in STEM.

The first Iranian in space discusses women in STEM and the power of business

Business took Ansari to the stars, and she believes it will be the key for more space innovation. “Private enterprise brings a lot of competition,” she said. "If you compare how much technology has changed over the past 50 years compared to how much space innovation there is, there’s a huge gap."

Digital Harbor Foundation is using 3-D printing to attract more girls to technology

Every year the girls dominate the Digital Harbor Foundation's 3-D printing competition. Four of the six teams last year were all girls; another two were a mix of boys and girls.

Scientist, Museum Director, Mother of Two

Science writer Alexandra Ossola, interviews Ana Luz Porzecanski, Director for the Center for Biodiversity and Conservation at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. Porzecanski's career is discussed as well as tips on finding balance as a woman in science.

Girls Inc. to witness historic test launch of Orion spacecraft

Girls Inc. and Lockheed Martin recently announced a one-year expansion of their STEM education partnership, which will reach 500 girls ages 9-12 at ten sites nationwide. Throughout the yearlong grant period, Girls Inc. will work with the ten affiliates to offer multiple sessions of Girls Inc.’s Science, Math and Relevant Technology (SMART) Partners program.

'STEM' disparity has early origin

Pieronek said the parents of young children may give their sons more chances to explore activities that would lead them to pursue engineering, and they may encourage their daughters to cultivate interests in more passive activities. She said this type of influence at such an impressionable age can lock children’s thinking into one mode or another.

Women Are Still Underrepresented In STEM Fields: Are Gender Stereotypes To Blame?

A book called “Barbie: I Can Be A Computer Engineer” was published in 2010. Recently, however, the book has undergone great criticism for its blatantly sexist portrayal of females in the industries of science, technology and engineering.

Latinas face challenges in STEM

Being a Latina in STEM is a catalyst for a volley of challenges foreign to other demographics, but it also comes with its advantages. The underrepresentation of Latinas in science, technology, engineering and mathematical fields is a growing concern within the Latin American community in the United States. With only three percent being represented in STEM fields, they remain a largely untapped pool of potential talent.

Black Girls Stand a Better Chance in STEM

Lots of institutions, both academic and cultural, have taken steps to show girls that not all scientists are men, publishing historical biographies on women in science and adding female scientist Legos to instill the idea that women can be scientists from a young age. But new research indicates that girls exposed to stereotypes about women in STEM elicit different responses from girls of different races.

Hour of Code to feature ‘Frozen’ characters

Code.org, the non-profit group that offers a free tutorial in computer programming to students as early as kindergarten, is preparing to unveil its second annual “Hour of Code” lesson, but with an assist from Disney designed to attract more girls to participate.

‘Millennial Women in Tech’ panel talks STEM struggles, successes

At DC Web Women’s Millennial Women in Tech roundtable discussion, eight women offered advice and encouragement for those pursuing STEM careers.

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