Science & technology

Data-Driven Cities: Urban Innovation Goes National

With fewer bureaucratic hurdles than both the federal or state governments, and the opportunity for charismatic mayors to drive local change, cities around the United States and the world are experimenting with new ways to use technology to create business opportunities and improve citizens’ lives.

NASA TV Previews, Broadcasts U.S. Space Station Spacewalks

Three astronauts of the International Space Station Expedition 41 crew will conduct two spacewalks outside the orbiting laboratory Tuesday, Oct. 7 and Wednesday, Oct. 15 to replace a failed power regulator and relocate a failed cooling pump. NASA Television will provide comprehensive coverage, beginning with a preview briefing Friday, Oct. 3.

Fund science; it's key to our economy

Now that Congress is back from its summer recess, members are considering a number of appropriation bills. Priorities are being weighed, and I hope — given our increasingly technological society — scientific research and science education are high on the list.

PM Modi's US visit: Defense, science & technology to lead India-US partnership

The tech-savvy prime minister himself set the tone ahead of his interactions, saying the US "continues to inspire India" in education and innovation, and he strongly believes in the possibilities of technology to transform governance and empower people in India.

NASA Expands Commercial Space Program, Requests Proposals for Second Round of Cargo Resupply Contracts for International Space Station

On the heels of awarding groundbreaking contracts to U.S. commercial space companies to ferry American astronauts to the International Space Station, NASA has released a request for proposals (RFP) for the next round of contracts for private-sector companies to deliver experiments and supplies to the orbiting laboratory.

Lockheed Martin CEO Outlines Technology Priorities

Hewson outlined the Corporations’ strategic technology initiatives, highlighted new Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) education efforts and challenged the audience to collaborate across the globe, connect technology development efforts to meet future customer needs and help inspire the next generation of technical leaders.

U.S. asks universities to flag risky pathogen experiments

Academic scientists with federal funding who work with any of 15 dangerous microbes or toxins will soon have to flag specific studies that could potentially be used to cause harm and work with their institutions to reduce risks, according to new U.S. government rules released today.

Driverless vehicles get smarter as Corps gets lighter

It probably won’t look like Google’s self-driving Prius, but the Marine Corps will soon get a hybrid-electric unmanned prototype vehicle as driverless technology gets more tactical. The Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory will build that prototype in 2016, said David Dahn, project officer for the Ground Unmanned Support Surrogate, the lab’s driverless vehicle project.

Using science for service

Today, Essayan-Perez frequently says that she “uses science for service.” She began by leading human biology workshops for girls in Nicaraguan villages; since arriving at MIT, she has worked with rural Nicaraguan high schools to strengthen math and science teaching, supported by fellowships from MIT’s Public Service Center.

F-22 fighter makes its first combat appearance over Syria

The plane is one of the country's most expensive—the F-22 program has cost $67 billion and only 188 planes have been built—but U.S. policymakers have been reluctant to use it in combat, in part because its high-end capabilities weren't needed for militant threats that the U.S. has been focused on for the last decade.

F-22’s baptism of fire impresses defense experts

The Air Force's costly and controversial new F-22 Raptor made its public debut during bombing runs over Syria earlier this week and defense experts said they were impressed by the first glimpse of its lethal firepower.

NASA Telescopes Find Clear Skies and Water Vapor on Exoplanet

Astronomers using data from three of NASA's space telescopes -- Hubble, Spitzer and Kepler -- have discovered clear skies and steamy water vapor on a gaseous planet outside our solar system. The planet is about the size of Neptune, making it the smallest planet from which molecules of any kind have been detected.

House Science Committee Hearing on NASA’s Planetary Science Programs

Committee members are enthusiastic supporters of NASA's Planetary Science Division.  There were few partisan differences expressed between the members, although the Obama Administration's budget requests for the Division were criticized by Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (R-TX) as being insufficient.

Consumers Increasingly Dissatisfied With New PCs

Are you happy with your recently-purchased computer? If not, you’re in good company. Consumer satisfaction with laptops and desktops has been sliding for a couple of years now, and PCs made by Hewlett-Packard are drawing the most ire, according to the latest edition of the University of Michigan’s American Consumer Satisfaction Index.

Critics and Supporters of Net Neutrality Trade Claims at Senate Judiciary Committee Hearing

At a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Wednesday, critics of net neutrality warned against the negative impacts of internet regulation while supporters of net neutrality said that practices by major communications demonstrated the need for such protections.

Pages

Contact Us