nasa

July 17, 2019

Fifty years ago, humans from Earth first walked on the moon and you can relive NASA's historic Apollo 11 mission as it happened with two amazing livestreams this month courtesy of ApolloinRealTime.org's Ben Feist and Space.com partner Simulation Curriculum, creator of the night sky software Starry Night and SkySafari 6.

July 17, 2019

As the country prepares to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11’s mission to the moon, a number of destinations with links to the historic journey are holding events to commemorate the occasion. From the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum in Washington, D.C. to Kennedy Space Center in Houston, plenty of sites are offering the chance to celebrate Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin’s first steps on the moon, 50 years ago as of July 20.

July 14, 2019

One of Christa McAuliffe most quoted lines was, "I touch the future. I teach." McAuliffe, the first teacher chosen to go into space, had planned to distribute science and engineering lessons and share demonstrations with students around the world. She, along with the other crew members of flight STS-51, died when their Challenger shuttle exploded 73 seconds into flight. Now, this long-mourned high school social studies teacher's "lost lessons" have recently been updated and made available to teachers.

July 11, 2019

The umbrella initiative, Summer of Space, is a partnership among NASA, the Collaborative Summer Learning Program consortium, and the Space Science Institute (SSI), and was formed to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing on July 20 as well as encourage science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education. More than 4,800 libraries from all 50 states have registered for Summer of Space, and organizers expect nearly 16,000 libraries are likely to participate in

July 08, 2019

NASA's Apollo programme was one of the most challenging technological achievements in the 20th century. Beyond the space race and exploration, it contributed to several inventions and innovations that are still having an impact on our lives. But at the same time, there are several myths regarding what technologies actually came out of it.

July 08, 2019

NASA has successfully tested the launch abort system for the Orion crew capsule designed to take astronauts to the Moon. An unmanned test version of the Orion crew capsule was launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida atop a modified Peacekeeper missile early Tuesday. After reaching an altitude of six miles...

July 01, 2019

Traveling through space isn’t just about knowing where you are. You also need to know what time it is, and a wristwatch won’t do. Spacecraft rely on extremely accurate measurements of time to coordinate maneuvers, and these systems will become even more important as we aim for distant destinations. That’s why NASA is testing a new type of mercury-ion atomic clock, which is smaller and more versatile.

June 30, 2019

Most of what we know about Saturn’s moon Titan comes from the Cassini probe, which studied it repeatedly during its 13-year mission orbiting Saturn. Cassini is gone, but Titan is going to get another robotic visitor in the coming years. NASA has given the green light to the Dragonfly mission, a project to send a multi-rotor flying vehicle to the surface of Titan. This mission is on track to make history in more ways than one.

June 25, 2019

The poll by The Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, released Thursday, one month before the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, lists asteroid and comet monitoring as the No. 1 desired objective for the U.S. space program. About two-thirds of Americans call that very or extremely important, and about a combined 9 in 10 say it's at least moderately important.

June 24, 2019

NASA's Curiosity Rover has detected the highest ever levels of methane in the course of its mission on Mars, an exciting discovery because the gas could point to the existence of microbial life. But the methane could also be produced as a result of interactions between rocks and water.

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