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To get engineers, companies offer advancement, culture and, yes, cash

The tech-talent debate continues: Some say Chicago and the U.S. suffer a critical shortage of engineers and developers. Others say that’s a myth. But all agree that companies must fight to grab the best. And Chicago companies are taking their best shots. Some experts say the engineers are here — it’s just a matter of attracting them. They say that takes finesse, a balance between wooing job candidates with compelling projects and enticing them with cash, benefits and flexibility.

The Common Core Helps Close Achievement Gaps, Open Doors to STEM Jobs, New Fact Sheet from CAP and AAUW Illustrates

CAP and AAUW’s fact sheet notes that by establishing high-quality, uniform, and rigorous standards, the Common Core helps ensure that all students are taught to the same high expectations. The fact sheet looks at how the Common Core State Standards can impact and benefit girls and women starting from K-12, through higher education, and after college and beyond.

Obama's Manufacturing Boost Could Be Boon for U.S. Jobs

In a closed-door meeting with manufacturing executives and academics Monday afternoon, President Barack Obama laid out a number of new executive actions aimed at boosting manufacturing in the U.S. by encouraging innovation, developing a pipeline of skilled workers and improving the business climate for manufacturers.

Is 'Leaning In' The Only Formula For Women's Success In Science?

Don't wait to be invited or encouraged to make a career in science, engineering or technology, Frances Arnold advises the young women she teaches at the California Institute of Technology. If you're a scientist, she says, you should know how to solve a problem. "Bemoaning your fate is not going to solve the problem," she says. "One has to move forward."

Deeper learning will drive educational, economic success of local workforce

Based on its review of outcomes from 13 schools that focus on deeper learning experiences, the study found students were more apt to have important interpersonal skills, such as the ability to work well with others. They were also 16 percent more likely to graduate from high school on time, and 19 percent more likely to attend four-year universities.

Women in tech: It's not just a pipeline problem

More than half of women (about 53%) who started out in the tech-intensive industry working in a business role immediately following completion of their MBA left to take a position in another industry, compared to 31 percent of men, according to the report prepared by Catalyst, a nonprofit group that promotes the advancement of women in the workplace "They are not leaving the workforce," said Anna Beninger, the director of research at Catalyst. "They are taking their talents elsewhere."

Chevron puts $20M into educating, training Appalachian workers

Chevron is spending $20 million on the launch of a STEM-focused program dubbed the Appalachia Partnership Initiative. The program is designed to “improve schools and workforce development in 27 counties in southwestern Pennsylvania, northern West Virginia and eastern Ohio.”

Building the Next Generation of Female IT Professionals

One approach that's working according to Angie Schiavoni co-founder and executive director of CodeEd, a non-profit program that teaches computer science to girls from underserved communities, is starting in middle school. "The idea is that we partner with schools, businesses and with other social programs serving low-income girls to provide teachers - who are volunteers - computer science courses, and computers," says Schiavoni.

The Country's Newest Education Entrepreneurs Congregate in New Orleans

4.0 Schools is a non-profit education innovation lab based in New Orleans and New York City that trains entrepreneurs to build breakthrough solutions  in education. In the past 4 years, they have helped launch over 40 ventures that tackle issues that range from youth unemployment to code literacy.

Women fall back in tech; reasons not entirely clear

No one knows for certain why the drop in women in tech has been so steep, though there are theories. "I think that is the big question that the entire technology industry is trying to figure out and trying to solve," said Susan Harker, vice president of global talent acquisition at Amazon.com.

Support From Future Employers Vital For Women Studying STEM

“In order to get more women in the pipeline and potentially in these organizations, to be creating the future innovations that are going to fuel our growth as a country, you’ve got to have more women graduating with those degrees. So you’re telling employers, here’s a way you can have a direct impact on the future workforce by supporting scholarships for women.”

The Paradox of STEM Training

Recent statistics seem to point to an overabundance of STEM graduates, and yet there is negative unemployment in some tech careers. Why the discrepancy between supply and demand?

Tech jobs: Minorities have degrees, but don't get hired

Top universities turn out black and Hispanic computer science and computer engineering graduates at twice the rate that leading technology companies hire them, a USA TODAY analysis shows.

Few students take AP STEM exams

The top five states with graduating students who had passed one or more AP STEM exams were Massachusetts (16.0%), Maryland (15.9%), Connecticut (15.4%), Virginia (13.9%), New York (13.7%), and New Jersey (13.1%). In most of the best-performing states, not even one in six high school graduates had passed an AP STEM exam.

Most employed 2014 college grads in jobs that don't require degree

About half of the graduating class of 2014 has already found gainful employment. But a survey by jobs site CareerBuilder.com has found about half of those people are working in jobs that do not require a college degree.

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