health

February 08, 2018

Last month, a pair of Apple shareholders demanded in an open letter that the company address growing concerns about children's addiction to their products. In light of research on the detrimental effects of electronic-media use, investment firm JANA Partners and the California State Teachers' Retirement System argued, parents need better resources to make sure children are using devices "in an optimal manner."

January 09, 2018

New “videomicroscopes” offer astounding images, helping surgeons perform and collaborate on delicate brain and spine operations. The equipment produces magnified, high-resolution, three-dimensional digital images of surgical sites, and lets everyone in the room see exactly what the surgeon is seeing. The videomicroscope has a unique ability to capture “the brilliance and the beauty of the neurosurgical anatomy,” Dr. Langer said.

January 03, 2018

Makers of just 10 drugs may have shortchanged the nation's Medicaid system by at least $1.3 billion from 2012 through 2016 by misclassifying their products in a rebate program, a government analysis found. The analysis also showed that while nearly 900 drugs may have been misclassified, in 2016 just four drugmakers were responsible for 54 percent of the potential misclassifications that led to the underpayments to the Medicaid Drug Rebate Program

January 02, 2018

“Overall, it will help manufacturers bring their innovations to market more efficiently by providing a transparent process for future submissions and making sure our regulatory approach is properly tailored to the unique opportunities and challenges posed by this promising new technology,” explained FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD.

December 18, 2017

Replacing devices based on 19th-century technology* and still in use, Cornell University engineers have developed a simple method for gathering blood pressure, heart rate, and breath rate from multiple patients simultaneously. It uses low-power radio-frequency signals and low-cost microchip radio-frequency identification (RFID) “tags” -- similar to the ubiquitous anti-theft tags used in department stores.

December 14, 2017

The general public is aware of the well documented dangers of tobacco products, drugs, and alcohol, but what about cell phones? That was the central question at the screening and discussion of the documentary, “Generation Zapped,” at the Shrewsbury Public Library on Thursday, December 7. The event was held by Wireless Education, a non-profit dedicated to providing information to parents and consumers so they can make conscious decisions about how they use WiFi technology.

December 12, 2017

Scientists from SRI International and Collaborations Pharmaceuticals in the US have identified a potential new inhibitor, tilorone dihydrochloride, for infection by Ebola virus. The researchers used machine learning methods to find the immunomodulatory drug, which is reported to have demonstrated significant efficacy with 100% survival in a disease model of the virus.

November 20, 2017

The world’s most valuable company crammed a lot into the tablespoon-sized volume of an Apple Watch. There’s GPS, a heart-rate sensor, cellular connectivity, and computing resources that not long ago would have filled a desk-dwelling beige box. The wonder gadget doesn’t have a sphygmomanometer for measuring blood pressure or polysomnographic equipment found in a sleep lab—but thanks to machine learning, it might be able to help with their work.

October 19, 2017

Immunotherapy for leukemia patients has been nothing short of a miracle. Now scientists hope to use that science and other forms of gene therapy to tackle three of the deadliest forms of cancer: glioblastoma (brain cancer), sarcoma (bone cancer) and ovarian cancer. Three scientists have received $1.3 million in critical funding from the Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy (ACGT), the nation's only nonprofit dedicated exclusively to cell and gene therapies for cancer.

September 18, 2017

The major advance in this study is “their methodology for designing simple DNA devices that work in parallel to solve nontrivial tasks,” notes Duke University computer scientist John H. Reif in an article in the same issue of Science. Such tasks could include synthesizing a drug in a molecular factory or delivering a drug only when a specific signal is present in bloodstreams, say the researchers. “So far, the development of DNA robots has been limited to simple functions,” the researchers note.

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